Starz Sets Premiere Date for Da Vinci’s Demons Season 2 * Mar 22

Source: Starz

Starz announced today that the second season of the historical fantasy “Da Vinci’s Demons,” an original series created by David S. Goyer (“The Dark Knight” trilogy, Man of Steel, upcoming Batman vs. Superman), will premiere in the U.S. on Saturday, March 22nd at 9pm ET/PT.

The ten-episode drama, produced by Adjacent Productions, follows the ‘untold’ story of the world’s greatest genius, Leonardo da Vinci, during his turbulent youth during the Renaissance. Starz greenlit “Da Vinci’s Demons” for a second season following its record-setting first season weekend debut on Starz on Friday April 12, 2013.

Outside of the United States and English-speaking Canada, “Da Vinci’s Demons” is distributed internationally by BBC Worldwide, in partnership with FOX International Channels (FIC) who broadcasts the series to audiences in 125 countries in Latin America, Europe, Asia, the Middle East and Africa following Starz’s exclusive premiere in the U.S.

Brilliant and passionate, the 25-year- old Leonardo da Vinci is an artist, inventor, swordsman, lover, dreamer and idealist. As a free thinker, with intellect and talents that are almost superhuman, he struggles to live within the confines of his own reality and time.

Starring Tom Riley as the title character, season two of “Da Vinci’s Demons,” finds Florence thrown into chaos in the wake of the Pazzi conspiracy. Lorenzo is gravely ill and Leonardo da Vinci must push the limits of his mind and body to defend the city against the forces of Rome. While the Medicis go to unthinkable lengths to deal with new threats, da Vinci continues on his quest to find the fabled Book of Leaves and uncover the secret history of his mother. He’ll come to realize that he has lethal competition in his quest — new enemies who may be even worse than the forces of Pope Sixtus. His search will take him to faraway lands and force him to reevaluate everything he knew about the world and his own history.

Riley’s co-stars include Laura Haddock, who plays Lucrezia Donati; Elliot Cowan, who plays the de factor ruler of Florence, Lorenzo Medici; Lara Pulver, who plays his wife Clarice Orsini; and Blake Ritson, who plays the ruthless and unwavering Count Girolamo Riario, nephew of Pope Sixtus IV.

Jane Tranter, head of Adjacent Productions, served as Executive Producer. The series was shot in Swansea during the summer and fall of 2013. The series is produced by Adjacent Productions, a label launched in 2012 that sits alongside BBC Worldwide Productions in order to identify new and original programming created and produced under the company’s umbrella.


The Promise – release April 16th

2014 The Promise Alan Rickman


This looks good

Alan Rickman, Rebecca Hall, Richard Madden

If you’ve been wondering exactly what Alan Rickman’s been up to since he took off the curly wig and stopped checking the floor for dog mess as Hilly Krystal in CBGB, he’s gone back to what he does best. Buttoned-up and starchy men whose passions are buried far beneath a crusty outer shell of respectability.

Look! He’s doing it here, in the trailer for A Promise, in which he plays Karl Hoffmeister, a somewhat stiff, but respected owner of a failing factory in pre-WWI Germany. Concerned for the future, he hires a young man called Ludwig (played by Game of Thrones star Richard Madden) to help take over his more energetic duties.

Sadly, Ludwig finds himself irresistably drawn to Hoffmeister’s young wife Charlotte (Rebecca Hall), especially after he takes on the role of live-in tutor to her young child. It’s at this point that history intervenes, and propriety is stretched to the very limits:

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Release Dates

Italy Sep 4, 2013 (Venice Film Festival)
Canada Sep 7, 2013 (Toronto International Film Festival)
France Nov 11, 2013 (Arras Film Festival)
Spain Nov 15, 2013 (Gijón International Film Festival)
Belgium Apr 16, 2014
France Apr 16, 2014

The Musketeers * Jan 19th


Adrian Hodges introduces ‘The Musketeers’

The Musketeers creator and executive producer Adrian Hodges (Primeval, Survivors) introduces BBC One’s new adventure drama.

Launching this month, the ten-part drama series stars Luke Pasqualino (Skins) as D’Artagnan, Santiago Cabrera (Merlin) as Aramis, Tom Burke (The Hour) as Athos, Peter Capaldi (Doctor Who) as Cardinal Richelieu and Howard Charles as Porthos.

“Our new series of The Musketeers is based on the famous characters created by Alexandre Dumas – D’Artagnan, Athos, Porthos and Aramis, some of the most evocative names in all fiction, names synonymous with adventure, heroism, courage and self-sacrifice. This new version is not an adaptation of the book, but rather a series of new adventures sometimes inspired by the novel, sometimes by the events of the period, and sometimes by more contemporary issues given a historical spin.

“Why not attempt a new adaptation? Of course that was an option, but there have been many, many versions of the book’s justly celebrated story – some wonderful, some not so wonderful – and I simply felt the time was right to do something different with the founding myth of the Musketeers and to do what Dumas himself did with history – respect it, use it wisely, but also have fun with it. I hope Dumas’s spirit will forgive us the liberties we take in this new set of variations on the classic story he created; at all times we tried to be faithful to the spirit of his writing, though clearly not to the letter.

“So why The Musketeers and why now?

“It seemed to me that although the adventure genre, however broadly defined, has remained evergreen in the cinema, it had been a long time since I’d seen anything of this kind on TV, at least outside of the family slots and dark hybrid fantasies like Game Of Thrones. Have we as an audience grown bored with the ideas of courage, selflessness, romance and heroism associated with the genre? I seriously doubt it.

“I suspect, and hope there is a serious appetite for this kind of material amongst the TV audience, something different to police and hospital shows (good as those often are), something that isn’t science fiction but which does take place in a world wildly different and infinitely more exotic than our own.

“Perhaps the problem is that the whole notion of ‘Swashbuckling’ has become fraught with cliché and is full of traps for the unwary. Too often, swashbuckling has become a kind of code word for insubstantial characterisation, endless swordfights which have little or no consequence, and a kind of old-fashioned approach to storytelling which is dull and encrusted with period trappings and lame jokes. To put it simply, too often the adventure genre is lightweight and disposable. It just doesn’t have enough weight to captivate a modern audience that is perhaps more cynical and certainly more aware of storytelling tricks than any before it.

“There are a number of ways to update the genre; you can take the mickey affectionately – as in Pirates Of The Caribbean – or simply transpose everything we used to associate with the swashbuckler and put it in a different genre, as with almost any of the Marvel Superhero films or most Westerns and space-set films. But what I wanted to do was take the genre seriously, provide everything the audience expects from it – period detail, sword fights, muskets, brave and romantic heroes and heroines, enormous risks, rescues at the last minute and so on – and also come up with something that felt, dare I say, relevant.

“In other words I wanted to write something that wasn’t jaded or cynical, and which felt like it mattered, but which also felt modern, exciting and involving, while always trying to respect the conventions of the genre. I didn’t want to write something that was pastiche or satire, nor something that was po-faced and glum. After all, if The Musketeers isn’t romantic, action-packed fun, then what is it?

“There are a number of ways to tackle the concept of modernity in a television adventure drama – Sherlock‘s successful updating is certainly one that stands out. But that kind of outright conversion to the modern era didn’t feel right for The Musketeers; I’m not sure the concept could really make sense outside of its original setting.

“So right from the start I decided we had to keep the framework everyone knows but then bring a certain modern attitude to it, something that acknowledges all the conventions of the genre, while also playing with them, sometimes humorously but never in such a way that we fail to show respect. I love this genre; I don’t want to mock it. I just want it to seem as much fun to modern audiences as it did to me when I first saw Richard Lester’s wonderful version back in the early 1970s.

“My most essential job was to look at the famous characters and give them a fresh look and feeling. Of course, all the characteristics we expect from these four famous names are here but hopefully in ways that will surprise and intrigue. It was a case of looking at the characters in exactly the same way as I would any others I try to create – who are they, really? What matters to them? What secrets do they keep? What world do they live in? What is the true cost of heroism?

“It’s about making them people a modern audience readily recognises and understands: heroes, definitely, but heroes who are not straightforward, who are very human and who recognise that every time they draw their swords, someone, perhaps even them, might die. And die for real.

“Above all I want these stories to matter to the audience; I want them to care passionately about the fate of our leading men and women, to feel invested. That way, the adventures our characters face really mean something, and every sword-fight, every ambush, every romance has real consequences in a world where there are enormous stakes to play for. But at the same time, humour is written into the DNA of these characters and I’ve tried very hard to honour that aspect of the original in ways that will please a modern, sophisticated TV audience without ever taking them out of the reality of the drama they’re watching.

The Musketeers is a drama – not a comedy, not a pastiche, not a pantomime. Everything about the detail of our world and our characters is as authentic as we can make it, because in the end, if an adventure doesn’t feel real, what’s the point of it?

“When I started this introduction I promised myself I’d avoid glib or too easy summaries of what we’re attempting with this show. But then again, why not? The Musketeers is a swashbuckler with teeth. And hopefully it bites hard and deep.”

The Grand Budapest Hotel

Release Dates

Germany Feb 6, 2014 (Berlin International Film Festival)
France Feb 26, 2014
Belgium Mar 5, 2014
Greece Mar 6, 2014
Austria Mar 7, 2014
United Kingdom Mar 7, 2014
United States Mar 7, 2014
Germany Mar 13, 2014
Netherlands Mar 13, 2014
Lithuania Mar 14, 2014
Sweden Mar 14, 2014
Czech Republic Mar 20, 2014
Hungary Mar 20, 2014
Singapore Mar 20, 2014
Slovakia Mar 20, 2014
Argentina Mar 27, 2014
Australia Apr 10, 2014
New Zealand Apr 10, 2014
Turkey Apr 18, 2014

The Adventure: The Curse of the Midas Box – Jan 10, 2014

Ancient mysteries. Powerful evil. And a fearless hero’s quest through a fantastical realm of steam-powered wonders and sinister magic… In THE ADVENTURER: THE CURSE OF THE MIDAS BOX, seventeen-year-old Mariah Mundi’s life is turned upside down when his parents vanish and his younger brother is kidnapped. Following a trail of clues to the darkly majestic Prince Regent Hotel, Mariah discovers a hidden realm of child-stealing monsters, deadly secrets and a long-lost artifact that grants limitless wealth – but also devastating supernatural power. With the fate of his world, and his family at stake, Mariah will risk everything to unravel the Curse of the Midas Box!

Quite a cast that we all are familiar with:

Michael Sheen as Captain Will Charity
Sam Neill as Otto Luger
Lena Headey as Monica
Ioan Gruffudd as Charles Mundi
Keeley Hawes as Catherine Mundi
Aneurin Barnard as Mariah Mundi
Tristan Gemmill as Isambard Black

Black Sails * Starz January 25, 2014


The pirate adventure centers on the tales of Captain Flint (Toby Stephens) and his men and takes place twenty years prior to Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic “Treasure Island.” Flint, the most brilliant and most feared pirate captain of his day, takes on a fast-talking young addition to his crew who goes by the name John Silver (Luke Arnold). Threatened with extinction on all sides, they fight for the survival of New Providence Island, the most notorious criminal haven of its day – a debauched paradise teeming with pirates, prostitutes, thieves and fortune seekers, a place defined by both its enlightened ideals and its stunning brutality.

The series also stars Zach McGowan as rival Captain Charles Vane; Toby Schmitz as Rackham, Vane’s right hand; Hannah New as Eleanor Guthrie, a determined young woman who runs the smuggling operation on New Providence; Jessica Parker Kennedy as Max, a tortured young prostitute who sees the dark side of New Providence; Clara Paget as the beautiful but cold-blooded Anne Bonny and Tom Hoppe as Billy Bones, boatswain of Flint’s ship.