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Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
Piffle, Whimsy and Games / Re: Lesser Know things about the UK.
« Last post by genie on October 13, 2018, 04:51:04 PM »
How would that all be in American English?
 

Just ONE,  I'm (insert adverb) sorry.  Might be followed by, "can I do something different", "do you require a doctor", let me get the door you.

There is a scene in Bodyguard, where Richard Madden feels he's getting a signal that his semi-estranged wife will allow him to kiss her.
He moves in and she turns her head away.
Richard says "I,m sorry" about times.  Actually, he says it a lot during the series.  LOL

2
Piffle, Whimsy and Games / Re: Lesser Know things about the UK.
« Last post by Luce on October 13, 2018, 09:54:15 AM »
Oh, poor Miranda!
How horrible to have to fight bedbugs and wicked pickpockets!
3
Piffle, Whimsy and Games / Re: Lesser Know things about the UK.
« Last post by Oso on October 13, 2018, 09:40:02 AM »
Speaking of Europe, my daughter is currently on a tour of Europe.  I thought she'd be having the time of her life, but today she is spending the day in Nice, at a laundromat washing all of her laundry, covered in bites and having her luggage steamed at a very high temperature. She was bitten all over by bedbugs.  :fav277:

She was pickpocketed in Spain.  Had her Vans tennis shoes stolen from a hostel.  Had her iPhone charger stolen from a hostel in London.  She is on this tour until the end of October... :fav204:
4
Piffle, Whimsy and Games / Re: Lesser Know things about the UK.
« Last post by Oso on October 13, 2018, 09:30:52 AM »
I think we just say sorry in the US.  The Brits are just more verbose about how many ways one can apologize. 

I like the no tipping policy in Europe!  Makes eating out much easier. 

If you order a glass of wine in a pub in England there are marks etched in the glass to designate the amount of wine to pour. 

I just got back from Beijing last night and in China you can't access google, yahoo, Facebook and many other websites.  That drives me mad!

Genie, peas drive me mad too!  If at home I just use a shovel to eat them.

Luce, waiters mainly work off tips in the US.  They are paid minimum wage and the real money they make is from tips.  So they want to turn tables around as quickly as possible. They don't want you to slowly graze and actually enjoy your meal...they want you to eat your meal like I eat peas! 




5
Piffle, Whimsy and Games / Re: Lesser Know things about the UK.
« Last post by Luce on October 13, 2018, 04:34:50 AM »



 LOL. Genie, who does that? Balancing peas? I love peas but they have to be cooked 'al dente' as the Italian say. Not yet done, if you know what I mean.
I loathe the English 'mushy' peas,  :fav210:

An evening robe? yes, I have one, but it's in my wardrobe. I put it on in winter, when I don't want to wash right after waking up. First breakfast in my pajamas and robe.




Don't Brits push food onto the back of a fork when they eat?


Ok, this is it.  You stab them in this case, holding your knife to keep them from running away.

I scoop them up on my fork using my knife.
Small children are given a teaspoon.
6
Piffle, Whimsy and Games / Re: Lesser Know things about the UK.
« Last post by Luce on October 13, 2018, 04:33:22 AM »
How would that all be in American English?
7
Piffle, Whimsy and Games / Re: Lesser Know things about the UK.
« Last post by genie on October 12, 2018, 04:01:11 PM »
Ok. Why are Brits so SORRY.

I'm sorry, I'm sorry.  PAUSE  Sorry, I'm sorry.

It's quite endearing, but sometimes there are SO many sorry's, you start feeling bad you every said anything.


8
Piffle, Whimsy and Games / Re: Lesser Know things about the UK.
« Last post by genie on October 12, 2018, 03:55:26 PM »



 LOL. Genie, who does that? Balancing peas? I love peas but they have to be cooked 'al dente' as the Italian say. Not yet done, if you know what I mean.
I loathe the English 'mushy' peas,  :fav210:

An evening robe? yes, I have one, but it's in my wardrobe. I put it on in winter, when I don't want to wash right after waking up. First breakfast in my pajamas and robe.




Don't Brits push food onto the back of a fork when they eat?


Ok, this is it.  You stab them in this case, holding your knife to keep them from running away.


9
Piffle, Whimsy and Games / Re: Lesser Know things about the UK.
« Last post by genie on October 12, 2018, 03:41:34 PM »
Does everyone have an evening robe (covers pajamas) at the foot of their beds?  I don't know anyone who keeps one there if they have one at all.



I have a question: why do Americans have big, luxurious kitchens but choose to get take-away food? That doesn't seem very logical!
[/quote]


Most of the time it's for the "I've got one better than you".  If you can afford one of those kitchens, you can afford to eat out.
Actually, I think those kinds of kitchens are made for people with large families, or someone in the house likes to cook. I think an opulent kitchen is a status symbol.  It's a real selling point to the house.

10
Piffle, Whimsy and Games / Re: Lesser Know things about the UK.
« Last post by Luce on October 12, 2018, 03:44:16 AM »
Do you guys balance green peas on the back of a fork before inserting it into your mouth?


Does everyone have an evening robe (covers pajamas) at the foot of their beds?  I don't know anyone who keeps one there if they have one at all.

 LOL. Genie, who does that? Balancing peas? I love peas but they have to be cooked 'al dente' as the Italian say. Not yet done, if you know what I mean.
I loathe the English 'mushy' peas,  :fav210:

An evening robe? yes, I have one, but it's in my wardrobe. I put it on in winter, when I don't want to wash right after waking up. First breakfast in my pajamas and robe.

I have a question: why do Americans have big, luxurious kitchens but choose to get take-away food? That doesn't seem very logical!
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10

* BBC Films

* The Guardian (Film)

  • post The Mummy: the story of the world's most expensive movie poster - 15 October
  • An original lithograph of the 1932 classic is set to sell for $1-1.5m, a record-breaking amount, representing a lost era of originality in the artformAuction house Sotheby?s is currently accepting bids for one of three remaining original posters of 1932?s The Mummy. It is expected to sell for somewhere between $1-1.5m, making it the world?s most expensive movie poster. It?s a scary amount of money.Ownership comes with no curse; this specific print, which will be the first movie poster to be valued in seven figures, was bought at auction in 1997 for $453,500. You can buy a gold-plated sarcophagus with that kind of profit margin. Continue reading...
  • post Bryan Singer rebuts as-yet-unpublished Esquire article - 15 October
  • Director of The Usual Suspects and Bohemian Rhapsody accuses magazine of ?rehashing false accusations?Director Bryan Singer has rebutted an as-yet-unpublished article in Esquire magazine, accusing it of being a ?rehash [of] false accusations?.In a post on Instagram, Singer ? director of The Usual Suspects, X-Men, and Superman Returns ? wrote: ?I have known for some time that Esquire magazine may publish a negative article about me ? what Esquire is attempting to do is a reckless disregard for the truth, making assumptions that are fictional and irresponsible.? Continue reading...
  • post First Man: Ryan Gosling's abstract Apollo mission ? discuss with spoilers - 15 October
  • The biopic of Neil Armstrong and the first moon landing has US patriots all fired up, but do Gosling and director Damien Chazelle achieve their objectives?Damien Chazelle?s film about the iron-jawed, ice-water-in-the-veins pilot and astronaut Neil Armstrong is a rocket pointed directly at the distant planet known as Awards Season. It ought to do well there, as its thrilling set-pieces, strong performances, dramatic score and sweeping emotions achieve escape velocity from typical biopic trappings.You?d think a movie like First Man wouldn?t have too many surprises; most people know that Apollo 11 landed on the moon and safely returned. (Some, like my late grandmother, think it was a hoax, but there?s not much that can be done about that.) Yet there?s a lot to rummage through in all this lunar dust. Chazelle and company make a lot of unusual choices. One of those choices got a little blown out of proportion into a quasi-controversy when ?alt-right? bozos such as renowned troglodyte Dinesh D?Souza, repeated the bad faith argument that First Man didn?t show the US flag. It?s complete poppycock (I saw the movie; I saw the flag) but it is true that there is no typical, shot-from-below moment of a flagpole penetrating the alien soil in Michael Bay-esque slow motion. It?s just there, in the background. Continue reading...
  • post Is Tom Hardy's Venom the new Greatest Showman? - 15 October
  • Critics mostly hated the ?poisonously dull? superhero movie ? but it?s a monstrous worldwide hit with cinema-goersIt is a truth universally acknowledged that a cinema-goer in search of a bad movie at the multiplex today must be in want of Venom. Tom Hardy?s unhinged superhero tale ? based on a Spider-Man villain, but lacking even a passing reference to the now Marvel-owned web-slinger ? is being showered in the viscous black goo of negative critical reviews. Chris Hewitt on The Empire Podcast declared it could set comic-book movies back 10 years and this publication?s Peter Bradshaw said it was ?riddled with the poison of dullness?.And yet, people are going to see Venom. Its global box office opening weekend of $205m has doubled its $100m production budget and the mammoth $80.3m domestic bow smashed the $55m record for an October opening previously held by Alfonso Cuarón?s Oscar-winning Gravity. It topped the box office again in its second week and is already within touching distance of the global box office total of Solo: A Star Wars Story. Continue reading...
  • post Is this the real life? Why ?official? biopics skip the scandal and keep it safe - 15 October
  • From Bohemian Rhapsody to Rocketman, can a film about an artist ever tell the truth when family and friends are involved?If the new Freddie Mercury biopic Bohemian Rhapsody doesn?t include at least one party scene featuring dwarves with platters of cocaine on their heads, I am asking for my money back. While that might look tasteless today (even if the party in question is well documented), there is an impression that the film will seek to put a slant on Mercury?s life, since it is co-produced by his Queen bandmates Brian May and Roger Taylor. Related: Sign up to our Film Today email Continue reading...
  • post Streaming: where to find the best space films - 15 October
  • From a 50s sci-fi curio to Hollywood blockbusters, there have been giant leaps in films that reach for the moonFirst Man is in cinemas now, in all its crashing, whooshing, non-flag-waving glory, reminding audiences afresh that the space race has served Hollywood remarkably well over the years. Even at its most scientifically credible, there?s an eternal streak of fantasy to the business of launching human beings far beyond Earth: for most of us, the sheer unimaginability of such a mission lends even the most prosaic space-travel stories a tingle of fascination.Damien Chazelle?s gripping moon-landing drama can stand proudly upright in the astronaut canon, but it also left me hungry to revisit The Right Stuff (1983), which I, like many critics, had long regarded as Hollywood?s crowning achievement on the subject. Continue reading...
  • post Eco-pioneers in the 1970s: how aerospace workers tried to save their jobs ? and the planet - 14 October
  • A new documentary recalls the extraordinary but largely forgotten Lucas Plan, which saw British workers attempt to make wind turbines instead of weaponsIt was 1974. A new Labour government had come to power on the promise of defence cuts. Swingeing job losses were soon to follow. Desperate workers at one Birmingham factory ? Lucas Aerospace ? fought to save their livelihoods, not by downing tools but by transforming from weapons-makers into one of Britain?s first eco-manufacturers, with early designs for wind turbines and hybrid cars.The extraordinary story of what became known as the ?Lucas Plan? is now being told in a documentary, The Plan that Came from the Bottom Up, that screens for the first time this week at the BFI London film festival. Continue reading...
  • post Johnny Depp defends JK Rowling's casting of him in Fantastic Beasts sequel - 12 October
  • Actor tells Entertainment Weekly, ?I feel bad for JK having to field all these various feelings from people?Johnny Depp has defended JK Rowling?s comments about his casting as the title character in Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald, the second film in the successor franchise to the eight-film Harry Potter series.Rowling had justified Depp?s inclusion in the film following allegations of physical abuse made by Depp?s ex-wife Amber Heard. Rowling issued a statement in December 2017 saying: ?The film-makers and I are not only comfortable sticking with our original casting, but [are] genuinely happy to have Johnny playing a major character in the movies.? Continue reading...
  • post Tilda Swinton posed as an old man in elaborate hoax for Suspiria - 11 October
  • Prosthetics transformed the actor into an 82-year-old man for her latest film roleTilda Swinton used prosthetics and makeup to pose as an 82-year-old man in an elaborate hoax for her latest film.The British actor, 57, is starring in the horror remake Suspiria, alongside Dakota Johnson, Chloë Grace Moretz and, ostensibly, octogenarian first-time actor Lutz Ebersdorf. Continue reading...
  • post Harvey Weinstein: prosecutors in New York drop part of sexual assault case - 11 October
  • Dropped charge ? announced in court with Weinstein looking on ? involves claims made by Lucia Evans, one of case?s three accusersManhattan?s district attorney has decided to drop part of the criminal case against Harvey Weinstein.The development was announced in court on Thursday with Weinstein looking on. Continue reading...

* CinemaBlend

* Guardian - Film

* Recent Posts

Re: Lesser Know things about the UK. by genie
[October 13, 2018, 04:51:04 PM]


Re: Lesser Know things about the UK. by Luce
[October 13, 2018, 09:54:15 AM]


Re: Lesser Know things about the UK. by Oso
[October 13, 2018, 09:40:02 AM]


Re: Lesser Know things about the UK. by Oso
[October 13, 2018, 09:30:52 AM]


Re: Lesser Know things about the UK. by Luce
[October 13, 2018, 04:34:50 AM]


Re: Lesser Know things about the UK. by Luce
[October 13, 2018, 04:33:22 AM]

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