Blessed Virgin – 17th Century

DRAMA CASTS LAMBERT WILSON AND CHARLOTTE RAMPLING
We’ve had quite a few lesbiefriendly projects announced this week, and here’s another one and it is period set too! ‘Deadline’ reports that Charlotte Rampling and Lambert Wilson have joined young actresses Virginie Efira and Daphne Patakiain 17th century erotic thriller BLESSED VIRGIN.
Lambert Wilson will lead the male part of the cast
To be directed by famous Paul Verhoeven, it will see gorgeousVirginie Efiraplaying Benedetta Carlini, a novice nun capable of performing miracles, who joins an Italian convent in the late 17th century, as plague is ravaging the land.  While at the convent she begins a love affair with another woman. Steamy and scandalous and delightfully sinful :) The story is, apparently, based on historical facts about the abbess Carlini.

 

Release date appears to be in France in 2019

Virginie Efira and Charlotte Rampling will star in Blessed Virgin

Mrs Wilson

‘MRS WILSON’  BBC SERIES
KEELEY HAWES, IAIN GLEN JOIN RUTH WILSON IN NEW DRAMA

BBC has revealed full cast and 1st photo for their new three part period set drama MRS WILSON based on memoir of Ruth Wilson‘s (she plays the lead) grandmother and her family’s complicated history. Iain Glen, our dearest Keeley Hawes and Fiona Shaw will also star!

YOUR HUSBAND IS MY HUSBAND  
Set between 1940s and 1960s London, the series follows Alison Wilson, who thinks she is happily married until her husband dies and a woman turns up on her doorstep claiming that she is the real Mrs. Wilson. Alison is determined to prove the validity of her own marriage – and Alec’s (Iain Glen) love for her – but is instead led into a world of disturbing secrets. Alexander Wilson was a writer, spy and secret service officer who served in the First World War before moving to India to teach as a Professor of English Literature, where he began writing spy novels.Biography | Drama | Mystery
The series will on PBS Masterpiece in USA

Madam Bovary 2014

Madam Bovery 2014

Plot: Bored in her marriage to a country doctor and stifled by life in a small town, the restless Emma Bovary pursues her dreams of passion and excitement, whatever they may cost.

Cast: Mia Wasikowska Emma Bovary
Ezra Miller Leon Dupuis
Laura Carmichael Henriette
Paul Giamatti Monsieur Homais

Genres: Drama
Type: feature
IMDB link: Madame Bovary

Based on a novel by Gustave Flaubert

 

 

 

 

 

The Piano 1993

2439Movie Synopsis

Writer/director Jane Campion’s third feature unearthed emotional undercurrents and churning intensity in the story of a mute woman’s rebellion in the recently colonized New Zealand wilderness of Victorian times. Ada McGrath (Holly Hunter), a mute who has willed herself not to speak, and her strong-willed young daughter Flora (Anna Paquin) find themselves in the New Zealand wilderness, with Ada the imported bride of dullard land-grabber Stewart (Sam Neill). Ada immediately takes a dislike to Stewart when he refuses to carry her beloved piano home with them. But Stewart makes a deal with his overseer George Baines (Harvey Keitel) to take the piano off his hands. Attracted to Ada, Baines agrees to return the piano in exchange for a series of piano lessons that become a series of increasingly charged sexual encounters. As pent-up emotions of rage and desire swirl around all three characters, the savage wilderness begins to consume the tiny European enclave. Campion imbues her tale with an over-ripe tactility and a murky, poetic undertow that betray the characters’ confined yet overpowering emotions: Ada’s buried sensuality, Baines’ hidden tenderness, and Stewart’s suppressed anger and violence. The story unfolds like a Greek tragedy of the Outback, complete with a Greek chorus of Maori tribesmen and a blithely uncaring natural environment that envelops the characters like an additional player. Campion directs with discreet detachment, observing one character through the glances and squints of another as they peer through wooden slats, airy curtains, and the spaces between a character’s fingers. She makes the film immediate and urgent by implicating the audience in characters’ gazes. And she guides Hunter to a revelatory performance of silent film majesty. Relying on expressive glances and using body language to convey her soulful depths, Hunter became a modern Lillian Gish and won an Oscar for her performance, as did Paquin and Campion for her screenplay. Campion achieved something rare in contemporary cinema: a poetry of expression told in the form of an off-center melodrama. – Paul Brenner