Miss Julie 2014

Miss Julie 2014Miss Julie is a drama film written and directed by Liv Ullmann, based on the play of the same title by August Strindberg and starring Jessica Chastain, Colin Farrell and Samantha Morton. It had its world premiere in the Special Presentations section of the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival.

In 1890, in Fermanagh, during the course of a midsummer night, Julie (Jessica Chastain), the daughter of the Count, an Anglo-Irish aristocrat, attempts to seduce her father’s valet, John (Colin Farrell). The affair quickly goes to some dark places, with power and class playing a key role.

Cast:
Jessica Chastain, Colin Farrell, Samantha Morton

 

 

 

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The Age of Innocence (1993)

Synopsis by Lucia BozzolaIn Martin Scorsese’s adaptation of Edith Wharton’s 1920 novel, romance between an upper-class gentleman and an ostracized lady is doomed by 19th century New York society. Shortly after his engagement to blandly genteel May Welland (Winona Ryder), Newland Archer (Daniel Day-Lewis) is reacquainted with May’s scandalous cousin Ellen Olenska (Michelle Pfeiffer). As the head of an esteemed family, Archer initially uses his standing to try to rehabilitate Ellen’s reputation, but he finds himself increasingly drawn to her disregard for the codes of New York manners. Bound by ingrained society mores and his peers’ insinuations, Newland tries to dodge his growing passion by rushing his marriage to May, but he cannot keep himself from confessing his love to Ellen. Recognizing that Newland could never abandon his sense of honor and be happy, Ellen pushes Newland to May and leaves town. The marriage proceeds as dictated, but when Newland unexpectedly sees Ellen again, he yearns for the affair to come to fruition. However, he underestimates not only what May knows but also her ability to uphold the rules of propriety. Sumptuously shot by Michael Ballhaus, the film offers meticulously designed costumes and settings that evoke a culture as seductively beautiful in its surfaces as it is stifling in its rituals. Unspoken emotions are expressed through such details as yellow roses or a clipped cigar, a fade to red or a single camera move. Using Wharton’s original prose to comment on the setting’s hypocrisies, Joanne Woodward’s voiceover narration suggests how much decisive power is buried beneath dainty femininity. The Age of Innocence received five Oscar nominations, including Best Supporting Actress for Ryder and Best Screenplay for Scorsese and Jay Cocks, and a win for Best Costumes. Although The Age of Innocence seemed like a departure from Scorsese’s prior work, Newland is as much at the mercy of his circle’s Byzantine structure (and his own conscience) as are Scorsese’s more familiar mobsters; Newland’s persecutors just wear white tie and tails.

Source: The Age of Innocence (1993) – Martin Scorsese |

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mBsI0eJy3o4

 

The Piano 1993

2439Movie Synopsis

Writer/director Jane Campion’s third feature unearthed emotional undercurrents and churning intensity in the story of a mute woman’s rebellion in the recently colonized New Zealand wilderness of Victorian times. Ada McGrath (Holly Hunter), a mute who has willed herself not to speak, and her strong-willed young daughter Flora (Anna Paquin) find themselves in the New Zealand wilderness, with Ada the imported bride of dullard land-grabber Stewart (Sam Neill). Ada immediately takes a dislike to Stewart when he refuses to carry her beloved piano home with them. But Stewart makes a deal with his overseer George Baines (Harvey Keitel) to take the piano off his hands. Attracted to Ada, Baines agrees to return the piano in exchange for a series of piano lessons that become a series of increasingly charged sexual encounters. As pent-up emotions of rage and desire swirl around all three characters, the savage wilderness begins to consume the tiny European enclave. Campion imbues her tale with an over-ripe tactility and a murky, poetic undertow that betray the characters’ confined yet overpowering emotions: Ada’s buried sensuality, Baines’ hidden tenderness, and Stewart’s suppressed anger and violence. The story unfolds like a Greek tragedy of the Outback, complete with a Greek chorus of Maori tribesmen and a blithely uncaring natural environment that envelops the characters like an additional player. Campion directs with discreet detachment, observing one character through the glances and squints of another as they peer through wooden slats, airy curtains, and the spaces between a character’s fingers. She makes the film immediate and urgent by implicating the audience in characters’ gazes. And she guides Hunter to a revelatory performance of silent film majesty. Relying on expressive glances and using body language to convey her soulful depths, Hunter became a modern Lillian Gish and won an Oscar for her performance, as did Paquin and Campion for her screenplay. Campion achieved something rare in contemporary cinema: a poetry of expression told in the form of an off-center melodrama. – Paul Brenner