Peaky Blinders’ Season 2

TV Trailer: ‘Peaky Blinders’ Season 2

Category : News, UK News
BBC Two has released the first trailer for the second season of Peaky Blinders.The drama series, created by Steven Knight, is set in Birmingham in 1919 and follows the extended Shelby criminal family whose many brothers, sisters, cousins and uncles make up the fiercest gang of post-war Birmingham: the ‘Peaky Blinders.Peaky Blinders is produced by Caryn Mandabach Productions & Tiger Aspect Productions and stars Cillian Murphy, Sam Neill, Helen McCrory, Annabelle Wallis, Iddo Goldberg and Charlie Creed-Miles. Tom Hardy (Inception) is joining the cast for the new season, which premieres this Autumn.

 

Starz Splitting ‘Outlander’ Season

The anticipated adaptation of Diana Gabaldon’s best-selling novels will launch the first eight episodes beginning Aug. 9.

Outlander Still Caitriona Balfe Sam Heughan - H 2014

 

 

Starz
“Outlander”

Starz is taking a split-season approach for anticipated time-travel drama Outlander.

Outlander,adapted from Diana Gabaldon‘s best-selling novels and executive produced by Battlestar Galactica‘s Ronald D. Moore,will air the first eight of the 16-episode freshman season when it begins, Aug. 9 at 9 p.m. ET/PT through Sept. 27, The Hollywood Reporter has learned.

The cabler will hold the remaining eight episodes for an early 2015 launch.

Starz also will offer an early preview of the first episode, “Sassenach,” one week ahead of the official premiere, on Aug. 2 at 9 p.m. ET/PT, in an effort to increase sampling. It will also be available on select cable, satellite and telco affiliates in the U.S. , reaching about 82 million households and online via specific websites, including the Outlander site, Facebook page and Twitter account, as well as Starz’s YouTube channel and the Starz Play app.

“We’ve heard from fans the world over who are anxiously awaiting to see how we’ve brought Claire and Jamie to life in what may possibly be the most highly anticipated series in Starz history,” said Chris Albrecht, Starz CEO, ahead of Friday’s summer press tour presentation. “Our Outlander sampling strategy serves the dual purpose of giving early access to the series premiere for those fans thirsting to watch it as soon as possible, as well as providing a vehicle that introduces the Starz experience to prospective new subscribers who are eager to learn all about this great new series.”

STORY Starz’s ‘Outlander’ Gets First Poster, Premiere Date

In February, Moore discussed the possibility of a split-season model for Outlander‘s rollout, something broadcast and cable networks have increasingly relied upon, much like AMC’s treatment of The Walking Dead and the final seasons of Breaking Bad and Mad Men, as well as ABC’s drama strategy to name just a few.

“I know I don’t want to do it like Galactica, where fans kept getting confused about when we were on. It felt like we were broadcast randomly at times. They would split the season and then we’d be on a different night; there was no rhyme or reason to it. I don’t know that I have a preference between eight-and-eight or 16,” Moore told THR at the time.

Outlander revolves around Jamie (Sam Heughan), who ignites a passionate affair with Claire (Caitriona Balfe), a married combat nurse from 1945 who is mysteriously swept back in time to 1743 and thrown into an unknown world where her life is threatened. Claire is pulled between two vastly different men in two irreconcilable lives.

For Starz, Outlander — often described as an expansive Game of Thrones-esque saga targeting females — comes at an opportune time as the network seeks to find a tentpole series. It’s part of a scripted portfolio that includes dramas Da Vinci’s Demons, Black Sails, Power and the upcoming Flesh and Bone, as well as forthcoming comedy Survivor’s Remorse.

 

Dearest, loveliest Meg – Part Eighteen

Margaret_001

 

Chapter Eighteen

 

“Dobson,” Wilkinson howled, “go back to the crypt! They are still in the passage!”

Meanwhile, I had reached the obstruction resulting from the first cave-in, about twelve to fifteen yards from the outer entrance.

“Douglas, hurry,” I shouted, “they are coming!”

It had the desired effect, for the moonlight was blotted out from the passage entrance when Wilkinson crawled in.

“Where are you, Spencer? You did not think I would forget about your father’s signet ring, I hope? Without it, the documents are no use to me. Come! Surely, by now you will understand it is a useless cause! I am the stronger man, cousin!”

“Hurry, Douglas! Hurry!” I cried again.

Although I knew all too well my ruse would be found out as soon as Wilkinson saw I was alone, it would give Douglas enough head start to flee from his devilish cousin. Wilkinson must have been taken in by my deceit because he proceeded farther into the passage.

 

A yellow light flared up which made me realise he had just lit a torch. The light did not reach the place where I was, yet it forced me to cringe against the earthen wall like a frightened rabbit in a sudden spell of terror. I bit my lips because I did not want to cry out when I beheld Wilkinson, who had a torch in one hand and a firearm in the other. He crouched forward with a lot of moaning and swearing, looked up and took in the sorry situation I was in. An evil grin spread across his plump face.

“Alone, my dear? So he left you to pick up the pieces, did he not? Never mind, you will do very nicely luring him to me.”

That part of the tunnel was particularly low since it was there that I had been buried earlier on. Wilkinson had to duck so low his chin almost touched the ground. He groaned as he put forth his effort to move forward. Was that what made him lose control over his ability to move? Completely unexpectedly, his gun went off.

The sound of the firearm’s shot was deafening and shuddering sound waves rolled through the passage’s confined space. Ears ringing, I closed my eyes and mouth as a cloud of dust from the collapsing ceiling washed over me. This surely must be the end; once again I resolved myself to die.

 

When the ringing in my ears subsided, I discovered I was still able to breathe. I forced open my stinging eyes and rubbed them. The torch, still burning, lay on the left side of the cubbyhole formed by the cave-in. On the right side, protruding from a heap of dirt, lay Wilkinson’s hand. He was still holding the gun. The rest of him was buried under the earthen debris.

I must have been in a sort of shock, for I could not move. Shaking like a leaf and cold to the bone, I was only able to press myself against a wall, my end of some open space, as far away as possible from my attacker.  After a while, pinpricks of my thoughts began to trickle deep into my numbed mind. Was he still alive under the rubbish? Should I try and dig him out? I recoiled violently from that thought!

Faced with imminent death of suffocation as the oxygen ran out, I wanted to take Wilkinson with me so that he would no longer be a threat to Douglas. Eventually, they would search and find our bodies and then Douglas could destroy the documents he signed in order to save me. It was a fair trade – a life for a life. Douglas deserved to be the master of Watcombe Manor; it was his birth right.

When the torch stopped burning, I closed my eyes again – a useless gesture since I was in total darkness.

 

When I heard voices from somewhere above my head, I was convinced I was dreaming. A heavy pressure on my chest told me that I was still in the underground passage and that the air in my small grave was running dangerously low. It was also unbearably hot, and perspiration was running down my face. Or was I weeping? Realising I must have been unconscious for some time, I did not know how much time had passed since I had been cooped up.

Voices again! One voice in particular was Douglas’ deep baritone, calling my name from above!

“Margaret, carry on, my love! Meggie, are you well? Answer me, Meggie!”

“Douglas …” I mouthed his name but it seemed my voice had disappeared. My attempt to speak was instantly punished by a pain in my chest; my lungs, deprived too long for air, started protesting.

I tried to lift my arms and push against the ceiling because, apparently, it was from there that rescue was to come. But it was to no avail, for I had no strength left in my body. Yet, when the shower of dirt that continued to fall on me finally stopped, I was able to open my gritty eyes and behold the terrified face of my beloved rake. I even managed a shaky smile but speech would not come, even though I longed to say his name. He reached down for me and grabbed my upper arms, then slid his hands under them and pulled me up in one strong gesture.

“There, there … I have you, dearest, you are safe,” he said, his voice gruff with emotion. Burying my face against his chest, I wept uncontrollably until other hands freed my limp body from his affectionate grasp.

 

“Monsieur, laissez-moi examiner Mademoiselle Dashwood! Il se peut qu’elle soit blessée gravement.”

“Yes, Madame, you are right. She might be injured,” Douglas replied in French.

Petite-Maman! Thank God, I was in the gypsy’s capable hands now! Those hands were probing my body and limbs with expert fingers. She then did something very unusual. She pushed me down, straightened my body and, grabbing my arms with considerable force, threw them high above my head, causing me to cough rather violently.

“Qu’est-ce que vous faites, bon sang!” Douglas exclaimed. He was ready to throw himself upon the woman, had not Jack Twinkler withheld him. “What in the devil’s name are you doing, woman?”

“Don’t fret yerself, Guv’nor!” Jack piped. “She’s only tryin’ ter free ‘er lungs from dust and dirt! Ye should be grateful, ye know? The gypsy woman only does ‘er job!”

 

“Jack, dear Jack,” I thought. He had come to our rescue after all. I saw other familiar faces around me. Col. Brandon and Edward Ferrars were looking rather worried and the former, after he witnessed a long talk between Petite-Maman and Douglas, asked, “Spencer, Margaret will be well, I hope? I cannot imagine what Mrs Dashwood would say if her baby daughter would have come to harm?”

“The gypsy says she sustained no broken bones or serious injuries. We must get her into bed as soon as possible, Brandon!”

Douglas, after glancing at Petite-Maman who nodded to affirm that I was not seriously hurt, gently picked me up and carried me to Col. Brandon’s carriage where he installed me on the bench and covered me with a blanket. He seated himself beside me for support. As the carriage began moving, I leaned back against him, marvelling in the warmth of his body as his arms encircled me. For a few moments, we let ourselves be lulled by the movements of the carriage, revelling in each other’s company.

“Is he … is he?” I tried but I could not make myself saying it.

“He died of suffocation,” Douglas said quietly. “The gypsy woman attempted to revive him to no avail.”

“I could not … I know I should have tried but … I could not …”

“Hush, my heart. Do not trouble yourself. There was nothing you could have done to save him.”

His hold tightened around me and his next words were uttered in a husky voice.

“My darling Margaret, can you ever forgive me for letting him go after you in that passage? I have been such a fool, I should have known he would search for us until the end.”

“I am to blame for that, Douglas, I lured him to me. I wanted you to escape.”

“You little fool … you could have died! Meggie, dearest, loveliest Meg, why do you always act so very rashly? I swear you will be the death of me, someday …”

 

By now, dawn had broken and Delaford’s driveway was golden with reflecting sunlight. A large company of people were waiting for us and at the head of them stood my mother, her arms crossed in a very determined way. Angry, no doubt.

“Listen,” I urged, “you must carry me in your arms, Douglas! I will act as if I have fainted!”

“Why, Margaret, surely …”

“Mother will try to separate us. She does not approve of you so you must appear to have come to my rescue! That is the very truth, after all!”

“We will do no such thing, Margaret,” Douglas said firmly.

When the carriage came to a stop, he alighted and offered me his hand which I reluctantly took; I threw him a furious glance. Douglas guided me toward the waiting group of servants and family, and bowed deeply to Mother. She was now clutching Elinor’s arm.

“Mrs Dashwood, allow me to present myself. Douglas Alexander Spencer, son of the late baron Sir Matthew Watcombe. I must ask your forgiveness for appearing before you in a less than formal attire but Miss Dashwood and I have been in a spot of misfortune.”

My mother darted her eyes from me to Douglas and back. She was speechless but no longer angry. When my charming rake flashed her a dashing smile, she actually smiled back!

“Mr Spencer, I am pleased to make your acquaintance. Do not, sir, concern yourself about your attire. Col. Dashwood already informed us about the past events. Margaret, my child, come with me.”

Before Douglas released my hand, he gave it a little squeeze for encouragement.

 

Poirot: Dead Man’s Folly

Agatha Christie’s Poirot: Dead Man’s Folly

Wealthy financier George Stubbs contacts the famous mystery novelist Ariadne Oliver, in hopes of creating the ultimate “murder hunt”. However, she begins to suspect foul play and calls on her old friend Hercule Poirot to help solve a crime that only exists in Oliver’s imagination – for now. A web of secrets and lies, all centered around a boathouse strangling, a vanishing, and an ancestral estate; serve to create an intriguing murder mystery within a murder mystery.

Airdate: Sunday August 03rd, 2014

 

 

Wolf Hall Costumes

Damian Lewis sports vibrant Tudor costume as he get into character as King Henry VIII for highly anticipated BBC drama Wolf Hall

 

There have been several famous on-screen portrayals of King Henry VIII.

And Damian Lewis is sure to give another memorable performance as the infamous British royal in the new BBC series, Wolf Hall.

The Homeland actor was pictured in his full period costume on Friday as he filmed scenes for the anticipated new drama at Gloucester Cathedral.

Royal style: Damian Lewis is sure to give another memorable performance as the infamous British royal in the new BBC series, Wolf Hall

Royal style: Damian Lewis is sure to give another memorable performance as the infamous British royal in the new BBC series, Wolf Hall

The 43-year-old certainly looked regal in his attire as he got into character for the show which is based on the award-winning historical novel of the same name.

 Damian looked fit for a throne in a mustard ensemble teamed with black knee length boots.

Inspired by the fictional biography written by Hilary Mantel, the story is centred more on the rapid rise to power of Sir Thomas Cromwell in King Henry’s court.

Period set: The Homeland actor was pictured in his full period costume on Friday as he filmed scenes for the anticipated new drama at Gloucester Cathedral

Period set: The Homeland actor was pictured in his full period costume on Friday as he filmed scenes for the anticipated new drama at Gloucester Cathedral

 

His royal highness: Damain joins the many actors who have portrayed King Henry VIII on screen

His royal highness: Damian joins the many actors who have portrayed King Henry VIII on screen

His royal highness: Damian joins the many actors who have portrayed King Henry VIII on screen

 

Cromwell had been the right-hand man of Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, special adviser to the King, but soon Sir Thomas took his place to become the most powerful of Henry’s ministers.

Thomas played a key part in overseeing Henry’s divorce from Catherine of Aragon and subsequent marriage to Anne Boleyn, and the English reformation whereby the country went from Catholic to Protestant.

Playing the role of Cromwell is the award-winning stage actor Mark Rylance, who recently won the Tony for Best Featured Actor in a play for his role in William Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night.

Not so mellow yellow: The 43-year-old certainly looked regal in his attire as he got into character for the show which is based on the award-winning historical novel of the same name

Not so mellow yellow: The 43-year-old certainly looked regal in his attire as he got into character for the show which is based on the award-winning historical novel of the same name

Not so mellow yellow: The 43-year-old certainly looked regal in his attire as he got into character for the show which is based on the award-winning historical novel of the same name

 

Details: Inspired by the fictional biography written by Hilary Mantel, the story is centred more on the rapid rise to power of Sir Thomas Cromwell in King Henry's court

Details: Inspired by the fictional biography written by Hilary Mantel, the story is centred more on the rapid rise to power of Sir Thomas Cromwell in King Henry’s court

 

Drama: Cromwell had been the right-hand man of Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, special adviser to the King, but soon Sir Thomas took his place to become the most powerful of Henry's ministers

Drama: Cromwell had been the right-hand man of Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, special adviser to the King, but soon Sir Thomas took his place to become the most powerful of Henry’s ministers

 

Jonathan Pryce is to play Cardinal Wolsey, Anton Lesser as Sir Thomas More, with Claire Foy as Anne Boleyn.

Mark Gatiss, Edward Holcroft, Ed Speeler, Elaine Caulfield, Jessica Raine and David Hobb make up the ensemble cast for the drama which will air later this year.

The title of both the series and book comes from the name of the Seymour family seat at Wolf Hall or Wulfhall in Wiltshire, though none of the action occurs there.

Vibrant: Thomas played a key part in overseeing Henry's divorce from Catherine of Aragon and subsequent marriage to Anne Boleyn, and the English reformation whereby the country went from Catholic to Protestant

 

Vibrant: Thomas played a key part in overseeing Henry’s divorce from Catherine of Aragon and subsequent marriage to Anne Boleyn, and the English reformation whereby the country went from Catholic to Protestant

 

Accuracy: Playing the role of Cromwell is the award-winning stage actor Mark Rylance, who recently won the Tony for Best Featured Actor in a play for his role in William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night

Accuracy: Playing the role of Cromwell is the award-winning stage actor Mark Rylance, who recently won the Tony for Best Featured Actor in a play for his role in William Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night

 

It also alludes to the old Latin saying ‘Man is wolf to man’ in that Cromwell’s navigation’s are dangerous and opportunistic in nature.

The novel was previously adapted into a successful stage production by the Royal Shakespeare Company earlier this year.

In good company: Jonathan Pryce is to play Cardinal Wolsey, Anton Lesser as Sir Thomas More, with Claire Foy as Anne Boleyn

In good company: Jonathan Pryce is to play Cardinal Wolsey, Anton Lesser as Sir Thomas More, with Claire Foy as Anne Boleyn

 

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2706270/Damian-Lewis-sports-vibrant-Tudor-costume-character-King-Henry-VII-highly-anticipated-BBC-drama-Wolf-Hall.html#ixzz38cn6VXr4
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