Tommys Honour 2016

In St Andrews, Scotland in 1866, 15-year-old Tommy Morris (Jack Lowden) is an avid golfer like his legendary and pioneering father, Tom Morris (Peter Mullan). “Old Tom” is a greens-keeper for The Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews, as well as the town’s club- and ball-maker. He is the two-time winner of the first major golf tournament, The Open Championship, which he founded in 1860. He also established golf’s standard of 18 holes per round. But young Tommy is beginning to chafe at his father’s dictates, especially in the rapidly changing world they live in.

Tommy soon outshines his father, winning The Open three times in a row while still in his teens. The “dashing young man of golf”, he draws flocks of spectators to the sport and becomes it’s first touring professional.

Father and son repeatedly clash over the unwritten rules of social class, and this culminates when Tommy marries his sweetheart Meg (Ophelia Lovibond), a woman of lower standing with a shameful secret in her past. As the story concludes, Old Tom makes a fatal misjudgment that strips Tommy of everything he holds dear. Following the results of that fateful choice, Old Tom takes on a personal mission that carries him through the final decades of his life: that of honoring his son Tommy

Directed by Jason Connery (son of Sean Connery)

 

 

 

The Aeronauts Dec 6 USA

PREMIUM SPOTLIGHT ON THE AERONAUTS PERIOD SET ADVENTURE WITH EDDIE REDMAYNE, FELICITY JONES, VINCENT PEREZ, TOM COURTENAY, ANNE REID

   ‘THE AERONAUTS’ 
AIM HIGH REACH FOR THE SKY
The movie hits Amazon Prime around Christmas

The two of them starred together for the first time in The Theory of Everything five years ago and both Eddie Redmayneand Felicity Joneswere nominated for Oscars that year for their roles in that one, and now they are working together in THE AERONAUTS but it is safe to say this one won’t be in the running for Academy Awards. It is ready, though, to premier November 4th in United Kingdom, and then from December 6th in USA and December 20th on Amazon Prime, following daredevil pilot Amelia Wren and weather scientist James Glaisher who find themselves in an epic fight for survival while attempting to make discoveries in a gas balloon.

  Inspired By True Events
In 1862, daredevil balloon pilot Amelia Wren (Felicity Jones) teams up with pioneering meteorologist James Glaisher (Eddie Redmayne) to advance human knowledge of the weather and fly higher than anyone in

This is the second time Redmayne and Jones are starring together

history. While breaking records and advancing scientific discovery, their voyage to the very edge of existence helps the unlikely pair find their place in the world they have left far below them. But they face physical and emotional challenges in the thin air, as the ascent becomes a fight for survival.

Erased For Being A Man?

Although James Glaisher was the real historical person, Amelia Wren is a fictional character who replaces his real life assistant  Henry Tracey Coxwell with a female version. Wonder what would feminists have to say on

The film is based on Richard Holmes book Falling Upwards: How We Took To The Air

that? They say the aim was to inspire girls that they can go on adventures too, but if that did not really happen isn’t it a despicable case of fabricating history for the sake of modern agenda in which a real life hero Coxwell gets totally

The movie was directed by Tom Harper

erased just because he wasn’t a female? While portraying Glaisher, Eddie Redmayne has a serious ankle injury and had to wear a cast! With Tom Harper from BBC’s War and Peace directing, the cast also includes Tom Courtenay and Anne Reid as James’ parents, Vincent Perez as Amelia’s husband.

Posted by DEZMOND

 

Dracula series – BBC / Netflix

GRUESOME TRAILER FOR BBC’S AND NETFLX EPIC NEW DRACULA SERIES HAS BEEN UNLEASHED!

   ‘DRACULA’ TRAILER
FOR SCARY NEW BBC SERIES
I did not expect this one to be so disgustingly graphic, but it is: BBC has released the first gruesome trailer for their new DRACULA series which will

Dracula is an upcoming television series developed by Mark Gatiss and Steven Moffat, based on the novel of the same name by Bram Stoker. The series is being developed for broadcast and release on BBC One and Netflix, and will consist of three episodes. Claes Bang is set to star as the title character.

Claes Bang takes the lead role of Count Dracula

also air on Netflix. Claes Bang plays the count himself next to always lovely John Heffernan as Jonathan HarkerJoanna Scanlan, Dolly Wells,

John Heffernan plays Jonathan Harker in the series

Morfydd Clark, Lujza Richter, Jonathan Aris, Sacha Dhawan, Nathan Stewart Jarrett, Catherine Schell, Youssef Kerkour, Clive Russell and Mark Gatiss!

Drac VS Victorian London
The series, which was shot in Orava Castle in Slovakia, is set in Transylvania in 1897, where the blood drinking Count Vlad is drawing his

The series will air on BBC sometime next winter

plans against Victorian London. As the producers say, hell has a new boss! Netflix will air the three 90 minute episode saga around the world with BBC airing it in UK and Ireland this winter!

The Noble Coachman Chapter 4

Chapter 4
Kidnapped

 

Arriving at Blevins Manor, Kip watched Sir Blevins escort a young woman to his coach. He jumped to the ground to meet her.

“Kip, this is my niece, Lady Lucy Blevins, who is staying with us for the season. I trust you to see that she arrives at the ball and is escorted into the hall. There she is to meet her cousin.”

“Sir, I will see to it that she is delivered safely. Am I to wait?”

Sir Blevins looked at his niece, wondering if she had further plans.

“Uncle, if this driver would not mind waiting an hour, I would appreciate that. I may not wish to stay. Otherwise, Lilly said her driver would return me here.”

“Very well. Kip, you will wait for one hour.”

“Yes, Uncle,” Lucy said with a sigh of relief. “Thank you.”

“Yes, Sir. Understood.”

Kip assisted her into the coach and was on his way. Upon arrival, he did not feel comfortable leaving her at the door with only the ball footman. She would be alone, once out of the coach. He pulled under the covered entrance; the event footman opened his coach door and exited Lucy Blevins. Kip jumped down, against protocol, and walked her inside the door.

“Miss, you are inside the door as your uncle instructed, but I feel uneasy with you here alone. I will park my team and return until your cousin arrives.”

“I believe I am asking too much of you, sir.”

“You would be doing me the service of not worrying about you. May I?”

“Yes, all right. Kip, is it?”

“Yes, Miss. One minute.”

Kip pulled the coach to a vacant spot, handed the reins to another driver friend and told him to tether the team, he would be back.

Kip approached Miss Blevins at the entrance into the hall.

“This is most kind of you, Kip.”

“It is my honor.”

“Oh, you certainly don’t mean that,” she smiled as they entered the foyer.

“I do, Miss. This is not just a courtesy.”

“I see. Well, it is more than generous, I should say.”

“You should say exceedingly little to me. I am but a driver.”

“I sense more to you than a driver. I cannot quite place it.” Lucy Blevins scanned the faces of all she could see. Her cousin was not there. “I am sorry you feel as if you have to wait. I do not see her.”

“Would you like to walk further into the actual ballroom?”

“Lilly said she would be by the doors.”

“Very well, Miss.”

“I see you are dressed in tails. Do you always drive in such evening elegance?”

“No, Miss. Only on particular occasions such as this.”

“I suppose I will allow you to walk with me into the ballroom, so I can see for myself if she is here.”

“If you wish it. I could stand at the hall entrance and keep an eye on you. Whichever you prefer.”

“I do not know anyone here. She was going to introduce me. Yes, I would appreciate it if you walked with me. At least, you do not look like a peacock.”

Kip chuckled, which caused her to smile.

As they entered the room, Lucy Blevins slipped her arm through his, surprising him. He accepted the honor and walked as the gentleman he was. It felt lovely to have a woman at his side. More than a year had passed since he was in the company of a fashionable lady.

“Kip, you look quite comfortable walking among the classes.” She smiled.

“I believe it to be my charm and good looks that help me pass for your lot.”

Lucy laughed. “My lot? As in upper society? If you only knew!”

“Are we both passing ourselves off as highborn types? How are we doing?”

“You are full of humor. I wouldn’t go so far as to say that I am a social climber, but I do belong to the more common side of the family. I think my cousin is being kind to me.”

“Could your cousin think, ‘I should ask little Lucy out. She will never meet eligible men any other way’?”

“In my mind, that is what it feels like. That is why I asked uncle to allow you to remain another hour. I genuinely feel out of place.”

“May I have this dance?”

“Kip!”

“Sorry. The music made me forget myself.” I must be more careful. That just slipped out.”

Lucy was being overwhelmed with this driver in tails. He was amusing her immensely.

“Do you happen to see your cousin?”

“I do not, but I cannot see across the floor.”

Kip faced her and placed his arm in the middle of her back, took her hand and waltzed her to the other side. “Here we are – the other side. Does this help?”

“Who are you? Has my cousin planned this whole evening? Are you the gentleman she wanted to introduce to me but felt I would run away? She slips you to me on a silver platter?”

“Brass, Miss. I would be slipped to you on a brass platter. I do think I shall put that on my calling cards. Being a gentlemen escort is rather appealing. It looks like I am quite proficient at it. What do you think?”

“I cannot believe the liberties you are taking if you truly are a driver. You are too amusing.”

“Now, you see; you have begun me to think that I could sweep you off your feet. You would be flattered. I would be honored, and it would be all innocent fun.”

“Will you kiss me goodnight, too?”

“Miss, you are not nearly ready for my fervid attention.” Kip kept his composure with a decidedly staid look while Lucy Blevins’s eyes twinkled with delight.”

“There she is! Lilly sees me.”

“Miss, you have been charming. I will wait outside until the appointed time. Thank you for allowing me the opportunity to regale you.”

“I thoroughly was that I must say. Thank you. I still have a feeling I will not stay.”

“I will be waiting if that becomes your decision. Good evening.”

“Goodnight, Kip.”

Kip bowed to her approaching cousin and left the area.

“Lucy, who was that handsome gentleman?”

“I do not think I will tell you, Lilly.”

“I have not seen him before. Here, I was going to introduce you to my gentleman’s friend, and you found someone.”

“Would you believe; he is my driver tonight?”

“No, I would not believe you. Coachmen do not come that handsome. And how many of them wear tails and walk ballroom floors?”

“You haven’t even seen the coach. I am living a fairy tale; I think.”

“Have you had any wine, yet?”

“No, but I feel as if I have.”

“Come. Let us find our gentlemen who were just behind me. I’m afraid I scurried over when I saw you.”

Miss Lucy Blevins was pulled merrily along by her hand toward two other guests.

Kip returned to his team and, as usual, found drivers milling around his horses and coach. Other drivers were looking to see what he was doing differently to attract more riders.

“Whom did you drive tonight?” Marc questioned.

“A Miss Lucy Blevins, cousin to someone named Lilly. She is a niece of Sir Blevins.”

“Dunno her, mate. Is she young and beautiful?”

“Yes, and quite.”

Kip took the wheel spoke to reach under the lid of his bench seat and pulled out a brush. He began raking one of his horse’s long mane and tail. “Are the other apostles here, tonight?”

“Mathew is across the way. Lucas is still expected, and I think Jonathan has another ball.”

This was the world he was coming to love. The camaraderie was always good fellowship. They spent many hours together and relied on one another. All of them were like a team of brothers. They were gentlemen drivers with souls of gold. He could never thank them for pulling him through some terribly rough emotional times that he had hidden from them after his sister’s murder.

Matthew approached the pair and patted down the other horse which was not being brushed. “Evening, gents. Is this Warrior or Soldier? I can never tell them apart even in the daylight.”

“That is Soldier. The three of us were rescuers late today. A woman came running to the coach, fleeing from a man. It appeared the young lady did not want to marry him, and they had had a heated discussion.”

“Do you know who she is?”

“No, I know where she lives, which I will not speak, but she was visiting near Hampstead.”

“Did you know the man?” asked Marc.

“No. I did go back later to see if there was a name on the house but there was not. In a few days, I will return to the young lady’s home and see how she is. I believe you are jealous of me, dear friends. Who among us does not enjoy the benefits of driving a young woman who is alone?”

“You keep telling us that, but no one seems to have your flair.”

“I have no flair, mates. I love women, as we all do. They are quite helpless against any man. You’re a hard lot, you chaps,” he laughed. “Anyone bring cards, Willy?”

#

It was nearing ten in the evening when Kip saw Miss Blevins exit the front entrance. He quickly scurried to meet her.

“Are you out for the air, or can I be of assistance?”

“I would like to leave, but not return home just yet. I feel quite shaken with my cousin and her guests. I think something is wrong.”

“I hope there is nothing amiss. Where may I drive you?”

“I know little of London. Can you choose a place for you and me to sit and talk? I do not mean privately; you understand.”

“Miss, are you quite certain? It is not my place to be a companion or socialize.”

“I do understand that. I had enjoyed your company before my gentleman was introduced to me. Is there no proper place?”

“Yes, there are benches in front of the courthouse. It is quite a public area, even at this time of night. If you wait here, I will bring the coach.”

“No matter. I will walk with you. Will you be shamed in front of the other drivers?”

“They may take to teasing me, but I will be admired,” he smiled.

Lucy felt her own smile return.

“Shall we go, miss?” Kip extended his arm, mostly because it was dark, and where he was headed was wheel-rutted.

The drivers moved away from Kip’s coach as he, and the lady appeared to head towards them. He purposely did not look in their direction as he handed Miss Blevins into his coach. Kip stepped on the wheel peg and lifted himself onto his bench. His fellow drivers were huddled together watching intently since he had brought her there on his arm.

Kip wasn’t sure what he was doing. He had done what he could to dissuade her, which failed. They arrived at the courthouse without much ado. There were the gas street lights and a dozen lighted windows in the Court House. He parked his team on the main street and attended Miss Blevins to a bench.

“You will sit with me, will you not?”

“Yes, Miss. Did you not enjoy your evening tonight?”

“It isn’t that which has me upset. It is my cousin Lilly.”

“Miss, this is not my business. Although whatever you say to me will remain private, reconsider that you are talking to a coachman. Perhaps, you should discuss this with a family member.”

“I am not sure what to do. I believe she is being coerced into something or blackmailed.”

Kip found his seat on the bench. This was far and away never the troubles he thought her cousin could be experiencing. “What makes you think that, Miss Blevins?”

“Twice she and her gentleman seemed to be having harsh words while they danced. I saw her frowning and shaking her head. She returned with watery eyes one time. The two of them kept taking short walks onto the back veranda. The gentleman who was with me observed that I noticed something was amiss. He became overly attentive to me at that time.”

“You do not think it was lovers quarrel?

“As they neared the table, returning from the veranda, I faintly heard her say, ‘I do not think I will do that.’”

“That could be a reply to any number of topics.”

“She and I are not all that close for her to openly confide in me. They wanted to leave early. I told them I would prefer to go home, so I left to find you. I did not want to stay with the friend, and he seemed anxious to go with them.”

“Do you know if they were taking her home?”

“No, I don’t, Kip,” Miss Blevins said as she leaned against his shoulder and began to weep.

Kip was not making any progress stemming the flow of her tears or her grip on him. “I feel you should be home explaining your observations to your uncle. He may have thoughts on this unusual situation. One woman and two men in a coach could signal … umm … improprieties.”

“Yes, I am sure you are right.”

“Splendid. Let us depart.”

Kip pulled his coach to the front of the dwelling where he had started. Miss Blevins was stepping out before he could reach her.

“I will walk with you to the door. Do you wish me to enter?”

“Yes. I will go find uncle.”

“Indeed, Miss.”

Lucy found her uncle, who was in his dressing robe and asked him to come speak with the driver. As the two walked towards Kip at the entrance, Lucy told him what had transpired during the ball.

“Good evening, Kip. What’s this Lucy is trying to tell me?”

Kip, clasping his hands behind his back, began his narration of events as he knew them, which was less than what Miss Blevins had told him. He mentioned he would have conversations with the other drivers.

“Please, wait until I dress. Kip, I’d like you to drive me to Lilly’s home. She is my sister’s niece. I wish to be comforted in the fact that she is home.”

As Sir Blevins left for upstairs, Miss Blevins approached him, took one of his hands, and kissed it. “Kip, I do not know how to thank you.”

“Miss Blevins, this type of gratitude is not expected nor earned. Please know your place.”

Lucy looked into his green eyes intently, “I think I do know my place.”

Kip felt the undeniable pleasure sweep over him, but all he could see was a black-haired cherub sitting atop a coach bench.

“Miss, you are charming and quite endearing but do not let your imagination take hold. This may be a serious situation. My help does not require payment. I desire that you refrain from complimenting me. You are putting me at a disadvantage, which is hard to resist. I am but a man as well as a coachman.”

“I am quite aware of that,” Lucy smiled.

Chapter 3 The Coachman Brotherhood

Chapter 3
Squeaks

 

Rebecca Dorset called Squeaks by Lord Stokes, and his staff was excited as today was the first day she would take the coach and reins though her father would be beside her.  Born into service, Rebecca had always been the apple of His Lordship’s eye. As a baby, she did more chirping than crying, and Lord Stokes began calling her Squeaks. The household adopted the term, and the name seemed hers for life. As she grew, she accompanied her father most days and learned his trade. As the years passed, she pleaded with Lord Stokes to allow her to take the reins when her father could not. Finally, worn down by her giggles and smiles, he acquiesced, never thinking she would want to do the same when she grew into a young woman, but he was mistaken. She took his promise as a gold-crested agreement and undertook her future career with sincerity and vigor.

Squeaks took to horse and carriage as no other woman known. She was unique and had grown into a beautiful, spirited, and intelligent woman. His Lordship allowed all the children born into his service to have a limited education. Squeaks was twenty years of age, neat, trim, and 5’1” with raven-black hair and light blue eyes, tinged in black. Her head was typically covered in a woman’s riding top hat. It, too, was the same royal blue matching her uniform; a dyed beaver hat with a large black bow to hold it on her head. She also had a silk hat for specific outings when rain was sure to stay away. The beaver hat could weather anything. Her hair was long, but she kept it braided. If it weren’t for the wide ribbon, tied into a bow at her neck, she was thought to be a small male until one looked closely.

As her father and Lord Stokes aged, she became more useful to their needs: fetching things and reading to them quite often, keeping them company when they asked. Squeaks knew she would draw attention, not all of it favorable, in her chosen profession, but she did not care. It was her first love, even with all His Lordship’s and her father’s admonishments. She was thankful for what the household had done for both over the years. They raised her. She was rarely treated as staff, running and playing inside the castle until regrettably she was urged to realize her place in life. The house became quiet, as she kept in the kitchen or stables, at the age of eleven. His Lordship missed her smiling face but knew it was time to prepare her for a more realistic life. And she still wanted to drive for him. To help her through the crisis of leaving His Lordship’s private quarters, he had a livery made for her.

 

#

 

Kip sat in the shade of a large oak tree watching his hand flow across the paper, sketching the scenery around him. He liked it when he was asked to drive to one of the parks. Being an independent coach driver in London rarely permitted him a customer who wanted to be driven out of the crowded and congested streets to more open landscapes. Trevor had settled in a profession that kept him among the inner circles of society, a place to which he belonged, but he would forgo for some time. Not yet, at any rate, although his self-imposed feeling of culpability for his sister’s death was begrudgingly dissipating.

Kip was lost in thought as he blended the shadowed trees on his paper. He began thinking of his life of wealth and privilege, nearly a year ago. His murdered sister was always with him, but seeing her through his dream states, kept her alive and eased his soul. Many times, he wondered if he was suffering some form of madness, after all. However, his brethren drivers lived a full and interesting life, which he slowly learned to incorporate unto himself.

Fully engulfed in his past, Kip snapped his charcoal pencil in half, unaware of the stress he had put on its point. “Damn,” he whispered loudly, seeing the mess he had made of his sketch. Brushing the small bits of charcoal off the page, Kip looked toward the carriage to see if he had been overheard. Apparently, his client and guest were not interrupted.  As Kip returned to his drawing, he smiled to himself. Today he was a coachman. Who knew it had been the right choice for him when he left home? He had lost himself in Kip, the driver, but wasn’t so sure he had done much about finding Trevor, the heir.

Out of the corner of his eye, Kip continued his drawing but could see his coach swaying. The couple seemed to be mutually engaged in one another. This happened often, but he always kept his ear attuned to any calls of distress from the woman. If it were two men, he had to walk further away, as the images conjured rankled his male pride.

He looked on as his two horses nibbled at the grass. Today he wore his tailored livery and drove his daily carriage, which had particularly elegant lines and structure, but it didn’t hold a candle to his “Queen Mary,” as he called it. Kip’s entire driving wardrobe was designed by himself and tailor-fitted. His high-valued clients who wanted the best in a driving experience received the full complement. Having the funds, Kip made the most of his new world, and it comforted him. He needed to feel proud of something – to be a success throughout his life, even as a coachman. And he was achieving that. Kip knew he was still an enigma to his fellow drivers, but they soon acclimated to his way of doing things and accepted him as a qualified brother coachman.

Kip heard a whistle from his client and assumed that their matinee was completed. He folded his sketching pad and returned to the coach.

“Where to, milord?”

“The lady’s home, if you will, Kip.”

“Yes, milord.”

As Kip climbed to his bench, he felt the man must be known to his father, Lord Caldwell. He wondered what his father would think if he knew this Lord was not keeping true faith with his wife.

Kip prepared for the harshness of the city. He navigated the most scenic and clean routes he could find, arriving at the lady’s home with an easy ride. Jumping to the ground, he waited for a signal to open the door. Often there were last kisses or soft words to be finished between the couple. Usually, the gentleman would knock at the side door when Kip was to appear and open it.

Opening the door, he folded down the step. If the lady exited first, he would extend his hand, and she would take it if she wanted. More often, the gentlemen exited first and took the honors. Quite often during the earlier part of the day, a lady would wish to visit some function or shop, and she would be alone. He would hand her in and out of the coach and offer to attend her and her packages if she desired. All these courtesies came from his own remembrance of the Caldwell coachmen. Whether it was the Caldwell’s’ expected courtesies or not, the practice had held him in good stead. He added his own standards for highborn people, and all his customers received it, reduced circumstances or not.

His client exited the coach, escorted his lady to her door, and returned.

“Kip, take me to my club,” the client instructed, as he came back.

“Yes, milord,” Kip replied. Even though there were several men’s clubs in London, it was his job to know his clients’ preferences. One or two drives for someone made him or her a patron; more than three, and he or she became a client. Rarely did they switch to another driver once driven by him. His elegant livery was better than most peerage in-service drivers. Kip was projecting an air of sophistication and style, which brought him higher fares and the most influential of people. For special occasions, he offered a second driver or the back-footman service so the client could feel envy. Changing from daily fares to evening balls was never a problem. He had clothes and coaches for both.

 

As Kip traveled back into central London looking for his daily hails, he passed driver Clyde Dorset, in-service driver to Lord Stokes. They nodded to each other as a greeting. His daughter was beside him on the bench. Everyone had heard a rumor that she wanted to be a coach woman and succeed her father. All the elite independents and the in-service teams, who waited at Parliament for their Lords, had been watching her ride with her father. Along with Kip, not one of them thought the day would come that Lord Stokes would allow her to take the reins of a team. It took great strength to turn a team of two, and Miss Dorset looked too young and small to handle the job. She was thought most likely to greet and open the door for His Lordship.

Today she was holding the reins aside her father. She sat proudly, almost bursting those cherub dimples with pride. Kip was earnestly amazed but assumed the coach was empty, on its way to fetch Lord Stokes where her father would then assume the reins.

 

“I’ll have a beef sandwich and a pint,” said Kip wandering over to sit with Marc, who had arrived at the pub before the others. I see Driver Dorset’s daughter is holding the reins today,” remarked Kip, restraining a smile. “She looks quite young.”

“Is she now?” Responded Marc with a laugh. “I’d suppose the coach to be empty if she were heading towards the House of Lords at this time of day. I know His Lordship is worried about her, but she’s determined.”

“I think she looks quite charming sitting up there with her father in her livery.

“You and every other bloke driving. We’ve all been watching her.”

“So, what can you tell me about this bewitching young lady. She’s small; it appears.”

“She was the age of 11 when Lord Stokes had a livery made to match her father. I’ve been told this because she’s about 20 years old now. I haven’t been around that long. The word is that Dorset lost his wife early in his daughter’s life. Lord and Lady Stokes looked kindly on their driver’s plight of raising her. They had no daughter of their own. I hear that her father, His Lordship and the staff have been raising her. She used to have run of the Castle, Dorset has told us.”

“I had a good chuckle over her small matching beaver top hat being held on her head with a large black bow. It endears her further to onlookers if that is possible. Being an independent, it is unlikely our paths will converge. I rarely have a call to Parliament. Seeing her today, holding those reins, beaming like the morning sun on a spring day, encourages me to be introduced to her. Is that possible?” It was a year since his heart felt a stirring of activity. “I’ve had my share of invitations from Lady customers, to which I decline, but a female driver is different. Her interest in horses and coaching is exciting my fancy.” A long-lost feeling of lust engulfed him. It was a raw and primitive urging, which never in his life had he felt to this extreme.

Lucas and Jon arrived at the table after ordering.

“Kip, here, would like to be introduced to Miss Dorset. Can either of you arrange that for him?” Marc howled. The other two joined in.

Kip felt embarrassed. “Apparently, I have asked for the impossible?”

“Well, yes, I say. It may be possible, but we hardly stand on having someone known to both of us to introduce one to the other. Only nobles are that principled.” More laughter from the table and Kip joined in the fun of being mocked.

Using polite society protocols had snagged him several times. Occasionally, he had to sand off the veneer of nobility to blend with the Brotherhood. All-in-all, his politeness carried a lot of reputation which was starting to reach far and wide. “I guess I’ll just have to outwit you blokes and accidentally meet her at the House of Lords.”

“You know Kip; your fares have been picking up considerably of late. Don’t think we haven’t noticed. We’ve passed you on a few of these night affairs and see you in your tailored tails and velvet top hat. Are you playing God to us, Apostles? You’re certainly doing something we don’t know about. I think it’s time for you to train us. You owe us that much.” Lucas cajoled.

Kip was rocking in his seat with laughter. “Lads, go another step with your uniforms, and you can raise your fees. We all know the gentry need pampering, and that’s all that I am doing.”

“I guess those green eyes, brown hair, pulled into a horse’s tail with a ribbon have nothing to do with it,” Lucas chided.

“Look!” Kip pulled out a couple of introduction cards. “See here. It has my name, Trevor Kipling, lists my services and address. I have been getting requests for my unique service, well in advance of events. It may work for you, too.”

“What are your special services?”

“Naturally, it’s my best bib and tucker, best coach and flowers for the coach vases. My coach is always cleaned, and polished. My boots are like mirrors. I can hire Ioan, you know Ioan, to ride second driver or footman. We can make an unusually rich look for being independent.”

“Damn, Kip. That’s brilliant.”

“Now will you introduce me to Miss Dorset?” Everyone clinked their beer mugs, roaring to the rafters.

 

It was nearing six in the evening, and Kip headed home to clean and wash the coach, and himself for the Lady Blevins fare tonight.

To accommodate his stable and quarters, Kip selected a residence with a large stable near the edge of outer London. His reputation was growing, causing him to check his in-town post often for reservations being asked for in advance. The name “Kip” seemed to be on the lips of many people wanting his premiere appearance, and he was being recommended among the gentry of society.

A quick look inside the Queen Mary revealed only bits of boot sand to sweep out. He dressed in his handsome, understated but elegant livery with tails. It was unlikely that any driver could match his coach, and they certainly never would match his horses, costing a driver five year’s salary for one of them. Kip at no time meant to laud his superior team and coach, over the others, but he wanted the best for himself. They had become the only spark in his life until he anticipated a way to meet Miss Dorset.

The Noble Coachman 2.99 Amazon

David Copperfield

January 2020, with Dave Patel

THE PERSONAL HISTORY OF DAVID COPPERFIELD starring  Patel, Hugh Laurie, Tilda DevSwinton, Ben Whishaw, Aneurin Barnard, and based on the famous novel by Charles Dickens. Out next January in UK, the story of this period set movie follows titular character David Copperfield in the 1840s as he navigates a chaotic world to find his elusive place within it. From his unhappy childhood to the discovery of his gift as a storyteller and writer, all the while on a journey full of life, color, and humanity. Check out the trailer below and tell us what you think!

Scroll Up